Posts Tagged 'success'

I’m not a quiet person

shhhh-mom-biz-coach
I’m not a quiet person. So when I get quiet, it usually means there’s something going on. Well, I’m excited to say that there is a lot going on right now, and I’ve been quiet (or out of communication) lately because of it. It’s good to finally share some of what I’ve been up to with you again.
 
The start of every new year brings me renewed energy and a strong focus. Last month I created my Business Plan for 2009, and almost as soon as I wrote down my goals, I took off and got into action to start making them happen. Seeing my goals on paper just sets me on fire and off I go! That’s not to say that I do all this planning and accountability on my own–I can’t say enough about how important my Coach has been for keeping me focused and on track.
 
I am creating a lot of new offerings for mom entrepreneurs that I can’t wait to share with you. One of the biggies is a new teleseminar series that will give mom entrepreneurs all the advice, tools, resources, mentoring and coaching they need to love their life and business! The other is the formation of Biz/Life Coaching Groups that allow working moms the chance to learn from and share with a community of their peers. It’s a great way to take the edge off the loneliness of being an entrepreneur and to get the support and accountability of other women who really get you and may have already “been there, done that.”
 
I’ll share more here when I have some of the details finalized. If you just can’t wait to hear more about them, you can email me right now.
Advertisements

The trouble with “balance”

I’m getting ready to give a teleseminar about time management for mom entrepreneurs, and that’s been taking me away from my other writing (this blog). The seminar is going to tackle some of the biggest issues mom business owners face: having time to do it all, and not feeling guilty for being both a mom and an entrepreneur. Admittedly, this is a tall order. (Find out more about the seminar at: www.mombizcoach.com and click the Events tab.)

One of the reasons this is such a challenge is because there is so much emotion wrapped around big ideas like “motherhood” and “entrepreneur.” Everyone and their dog has something to say about how things are supposed to go. If you’re a mom, you should stay home with your children, breastfeed them until they’re old enough to say, “No more, thanks, Mom!”, provide educational direction, character-building opportunities, and hot, healthy, organic meals to boot until they leave you almost 20 years later for someone/thing they love more than you. Well, those are just some of the things some people expect of mothers.

Entrepreneurs don’t get a much better go at it. They’re expected to be up to amazing tests of character and knowledge, to have the vision of SuperMan, the stamina of an Energizer Bunny, the discipline of a Marine Corps drill seargent, and all of their waking (and sleeping?) hours to devote to the growth of their business.

A lot of people (myself included) promote the idea of a healthy balance of these two completely different worlds. Balance is about three major points:

  1. The goal is to simply accept yourself.
  2.  Once you’re good with that, then set some priorities that are important to you.
  3. When you’re clear on what’s most important to you, then be intentional about how you spend your time on those priorities and let the other stuff go.

This philosophy is what makes it okay for me to feel very successful and satisfied with my life as a mom and an entrepreneur. I might not be successful in someone else’s terms (So what if I haven’t brushed my two-year-old daughter’s hair since she was born? And that pile of clutter easily found in every room of my house? Well, the pile and I have a mutual understanding now. We’ve learned to co-exist. And I know people who work 16 hour days in very stressful jobs who might not think I spend enough time stressing about my business. Hmmm. Ok.), but I am successful according to my own terms.

Balance comes for me when I focus on my priorities, then spend time doing the things that support those priorities, which are the things that are most important to me. It’s also about letting go of the things I’m not good at, or that I hate, or even the things that others want for me, but aren’t the things I want.

To have a balanced life, I have completely let go of the “coulda, woulda, shoulda” paradigm. I am focused on the most important things in my life: my family, my health and happiness, and my business. From my perspective, I’m doing great with the biggies. And I’m really getting good at ignoring the dust bunnies and the laundry mountain just outside my office door. Balance is all about making peace with all the extra things you could be doing, but that don’t matter as much as the biggies. So I think I’m just going to string some Christmas lights on that damn pile of clothes. Make it pretty. Or I could drag it out in the front yard, let some snow fall on it, and my kids would have a blast sledding down it. Now, there’s a SuperMom!

Are you the parent you always wanted to be?

I’m gathering some information for an upcoming speaking engagement. I’m interested in learning how you feel about yourself as a parent. Right now, are you the parent you always wanted to be? If so, what wisdom or advice can you share with other parents? If not, what do you feel is keeping you from being your version of the “ideal” parent?

Please share your successes and struggles. What keeps you up at night? What do you most wish you could do/be for your children? What did you finally realize that made you satisfied with yourself?

All comments welcome!

Are you in over your head?

On a coaching call today, my client was wrestling with a challenge that I have certainly experienced as an entrepreneur (and as a mom, and as a teacher, and as a sales rep, and as a human…need I go on?). Her desire to please others causes her to overpromise, to bite off more than she can chew, and then to struggle with the stress, exhaustion and overwhelm that ensue after she’s made promises she knows she can’t keep.

Why do we get in over our heads? I have some thoughts on this.

First, as entrepreneurs, especially those who are in the start-up phase of their business, getting clients can be really difficult. Getting clients to believe in you, trust in your product or expertise, and to choose you over your competition can be a huge challenge. So when a client shows up, says, “Yeah, I’ll have some of what you have to offer,” and agrees to pay the price you set for it, you might be tempted to do some wacky things (like promise more than you can deliver, or neglect to mention that you need more time to get the desired results, or not ask for clarification on the project at hand) out of pure gratitude. After all, you’re going to get paid, right? So why not make them extra happy that you went above and beyond their wildest expectations? This is the desire to distinguish yourself in your field and to prove yourself worthy of the business.

I had a friend who was a realtor who was so hungry for business (this was fueled by financial needs, but also by her love of her work) that it drove her to try to be everything to her clients. She considered herself a “full service realtor.” Apparently, letting the home owners’ dog out at regular intervals during the day, tidying up the house, running personal errands for her clients and the like were all part of the full suite of services she offered as a realtor. After keeping this up for a year or two, she got really burned out and her job felt more like a burden than the source of challenge, fun and interest it had been. Her “disease to please” got the best of her, but fortunately her state of overwhelm nicely coincided with a lot of listings and sales. With a little breathing space in her bank account, she was able to choose not to offer all those additional services that were a source of personal expense to her. And her clients still loved her and referred her to others.

Secondly, we sometimes overpromise what we can deliver because we simply don’t know our own limitations. Our excitement about our work and our passion for what we do can cause us business owners to forget to factor in very basic elements of life: the need for sleep, for time away from work, for a backup plan, the risk involved when relying on others, all manner of non-billable hours to get the job done. With experience or with the support of a mentor, this tendency can be minimized.

Where do you get in over your head? Have you made promises you can’t keep to your clients, your co-workers, your family, or your friends? What impact did it have on you and them? What strategy have you put in place to manage this?

Delicate balance: mothers in business

As a mother of three children under six years old who owns her own company, I spend a lot of time doing one thing while thinking I “should” be doing another. Sometimes I’m building Legos with the kids and I’ll remember I’m on deadline for something I’m writing. Other times I’m sitting at the computer responding to a client or doing research on my target audience, only to have a nagging feeling that I should be back downstairs drawing silly sketches or playing hide and seek with the kids.And I know I’m not alone. Mothers in business, “mompreneurs”, have particular challenges when it comes to the issue of balancing business and babies. Without question, priority #1 is my family. I chose to be a mother a while back and have no doubt that this is exactly who I am supposed to be. But my journey to become a mother who also has a fulfilling career has been a not-so-graceful dance between passion, commitment, ambition, guilt, joy and inspiration. Can we truly have it all?

I’m collecting thoughts, witticisms, rants and such from women who are the primary caretakers of their family and who own their own businesses or who want to return to work but feel conflicted about it. If this describes you, please post your comments here.

Some questions to ponder:

  1. Why do you (want to) work?
  2. What are your biggest challenges as a mother/business owner?
  3. Does your husband/significant other support your choice to pursue a career?
  4. Does your work satisfy you? If so, why?
  5. What do you have to sacrifice to be a “mompreneur”?
  6. What is the most gratifying part of your work?
  7. What inspires you?
  8. What do you hope to teach your children by being a mother/business owner?
  9. What does “success” mean to you?

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!


New here? You might want to subscribe to my blog so you can keep up to date.

Bookmark and Share
Ajax CommentLuv Enabled ce04dceb043a512b0ef80e0342096179
October 2019
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Mom Biz Coach Live on Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Add me as a friend!

Lara Galloway's Facebook profile

Get business coaching and success tips for mom entrepreneurs by tuning in!

Listen to Lara Galloway, The Mom Biz Coach on BlogTalkRadio talk radio
Advertisements